?

Log in

07 November 2007 @ 04:14 pm
I can knit holding my needles however (though I kind of suck at Continental), but the way I learned from my grandmother I've never seen anyone but my family do. It's most like Combined, I think, but my grandmother held her work so that it draped over the top of her hand, and the needle holding it rested between her thumb and index finger across the back of her hand. I don't know that I'm describing it that well; I'd think I'd have to show it to get the idea across clearly. She definitely knitted through the back loop as default. Is this a known style, a strange regional variation, or what?

(Also, on top of this, I knit lefty, moving the work from right hand to left--making patterns pretty much useless. Use charts, dammit. >:|

...I knit a lot of scarves.)
 
 
17 April 2007 @ 01:12 am
#include <stdknitting.h>
#include <string.h>

int Main() {

new knitproj(starfish);
int castonnum = 10;

starfish.Caston("provisional", castonnum);

for (int x=5;x>=0;x--){
for (int x=castonnum;x>=0;x--) {
starfish.knit(x);
starfish.Turn();
starfish.Purl(x);
}
}

starfish.kitchener(starfish.get_stitchHolder(0),starfish.get_needle(0));

starfish.block();

Return 0;
}
Tags:
 
 
Mood: lj ruined my autotabs
 
 
Any pattern described as "hip" or "funky" isn't.

"Knit in awesome chunky yarn" means "I don't knit all that well and this covers my mistakes." (<--I am so very guilty of this.)

Knit skirts are always a mistake. Always.

Just because you can make a knitted version of something (shoes, office supplies, family pets, your Nintendo, coffee mugs, the Space Shuttle) doesn't mean you should.

An ugly pattern knit in handspun yarn harvested from organic grass-fed alpacas by Buddhist monks is still ugly.

People do entrelac to prove they can.

Someone this very second is creating a pattern so incomprehensible archaeologists from the future will be puzzled for thousands of years. Then they will post it to their blog as "quick and easy!"

Continental knitters are superior to other knitters.

DPN Continental knitters are superior to other Continental knitters.

Continental sock knitters are superior to other DPN Continental knitters.

Continental sock knitters who write their own patterns give orders to God.
 
 
19 August 2006 @ 12:33 pm
A simple dice bag with a little gold skull on it. Skull design was taken from Diesel Sweeties.

MATERIALS
Two balls Paton's Brilliant, one in gold(or silver) and one in black. Black is MC.
One set of 5 US size 2 DPNs.

Note: bar inc is the same as a kfb increase.

BASE
Using a provisional cast on, CO 6 sts in MC.

Row 1: Knit all sts.
Row 2: slip 1st sts onto stitch holder 1, bar inc, k to 2 sts from end, bar inc, slip last sts onto stitch holder 2.
Row 3: bar inc, knit to 1 sts from end, bar inc.
Repeat rows 2 and 3 until there are 12 sts on needle

Row 1: bar inc, k to 1 sts from end, bar inc
Row 2: slip 1st sts onto stitch holder 1, k to 1 sts from end, slip last sts onto stitch holder 2
Repeat rows 1 and 2 for a total of 6 rows.

Row 1: k all sts
Row 2: slip 1st sts onto stitch holder 1, k to 1 sts from end, slip last sts onto stitch holder 2
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until there are 6 sts on needle.

BODY
Move all sts off stitch holders onto 4 DPNs, dividing number of sts evenly.

Row 1: k all sts on all needles
Row 2: (k, bar inc, k to 2 sts from end, bar inc, k) on each needle
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until there are 16 sts on each needle.

Continue in st st for two rows. Then continue in st st in the round, and on one of the needles, using stranding, implement the following chart on one of the needles, with 1 st of padding on the edge of the needle on each side of the skull:

(MC 2, CC 2, MC 2, CC 2, MC 2, CC 2, MC 2) X2 rows
(MC 2, CC 10, MC 2) X2 rows
(CC 6,MC 2,CC 6) X2 rows
(CC 14) X2 rows
(CC 2,MC 4,CC 2,MC 4, CC 2) X2 rows
(CC 14) X2 rows
(MC 2,CC 10,MC 2) X2 rows

(MC for rest of pattern).

Continue in st st for two rows.

Row 1: (k, ssk, k to 3 sts from end, k2tog, k) on each needle
Row 2: k all sts on each needle
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until there are 10 sts on each needle.

K one row
*k4, bo 2, repeat from * to end of row
*inc, k2, inc, repeat from * to end of row
k1, p1 rib for 3 rows
K one row
BO all sts.

FINISHING
Weave in the ends. Knit a foot long 3 st wide icord and thread it through the holes, the tie should go at the absent hole at the beginning of the row. Once threaded, tie a granny knot through the very ends of the icord and darn the knots in place. Fill bag with coins, gold dice, dice carved from human bones, or perhaps little shrunken heads.
Tags:
 
 
19 August 2006 @ 11:42 am
So I've got this "knit, purl" thing mostly figured out. I was thinking about making this, both because it seems reasonably simple, it would be very nice for autumn, and I've seen one knitted up and it looked great.

Questions, then. Could I knit this one "backwards" (ie, left-handed) and have it turn out all right? Reading patterns isn't really intuitive to me yet. Could I also knit this in whatever bulky yarn I felt like? It looks like it would be pretty forgiving, but I have no idea. And last, when I decide to start on this, who wants to come to the yarn shop with me?
 
 
 
18 August 2006 @ 05:45 pm
I set the default posting security to friends-only. This means all posts will automatically be friends only. If you would like to post something public, just post it and then edit it to change the security level.
Tags:
 
 
18 August 2006 @ 12:58 pm
Is there a locally-owned yarn shop in Worcester, or do I have to go to Jo-Ann's?

Er, *waves to purly*